Recommended Foster Care Books - For Kids

Maybe Days
For many children in foster care, the answer to many questions is often maybe. Maybe Days is a straightforward look at the issues of foster care, the questions that children ask, and the feelings that they confront. A primer for children going into foster care, the book also explains in children's terms the responsibilities of everyone involved - parents, social workers, lawyers, and judges. As for the children themselves, their job is to be a kid - and there's no maybe about that.

Kids Need to Be Safe: A Book for Children in Foster Care (Kids Are Important)  “Kids are important… They need safe places to live, and safe places to play.” For some kids, this means living with foster parents. In simple words and full-color illustrations, this book explains why some kids move to foster homes, what foster parents do, and ways kids might feel during foster care. Children often believe that they are in foster care because they are “bad.” This book makes it clear that the troubles in their lives are not their fault; the message throughout is one of hope and support. Includes resources and information for parents, foster parents, social workers, counselors, and teachers.

Families Change: A Book for Children Experiencing Termination of Parental Rights (Kids Are Important Series)
All families change over time. Sometimes a baby is born, or a grown-up gets married. And sometimes a child gets a new foster parent or a new adopted mom or dad. Children need to know that when this happens, it’s not their fault. They need to understand that they can remember and value their birth family and love their new family, too. Straightforward words and full-color illustrations offer hope and support for children facing or experiencing change. Includes resources and information for birth parents, foster parents, social workers, counselors, and teachers.

Murphy's Three Homes: A Story for Children in Foster Care 
Murphy, a Tibetan Terrier puppy, is told he is a 'good luck dog' - he is cheerful, happy, and loves to play and wag his tail. However, after going through two different homes and an animal shelter, Murphy starts to feel like a 'bad luck dog' who nobody wants.

Trauma-Focused 
A Terrible Thing Happened
After Sherman sees something terrible happen, he becomes anxious and then angry, but when a counselor helps him talk about these emotions he feels better.

What other books do you find yourself recommending for new foster parents to have on hand to read to/with kiddos?